What We Do

NECIS members work on a variety of invasive species issues. Because harmful plants and animals may arrive through very different introduction pathways, many of our campaigns focus on particular types of species and their associated introduction pathways.  Other campaigns emphasize different approaches for preventing or containing harmful species introductions.

Burmese python, photo by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Burmese python, photo by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

NECIS members are working to close off the live animal importation pathway for invasives by modernizing regulations and promoting policies that would require proactive risk screening of new species of exotic fish and wildlife.

Lymantria dispar dispar, also known as the gypsy moth. Photo by Didier Descouens.

Gypsy moth. Photo by Didier Descouens.

NECIS members are working to prevent the unintentional introduction of new forest pests and diseases by supporting revision of USDA regulations and practices so they more effectively reduce infestations on imported live plants and wood packing material.

Napier grass (Pennisetum purpureum), photo by Julie Sibbing, NWF

Napier grass. Photo by Julie Sibbing, NWF

NECIS members are taking action to prevent the importation and release of invasive plants in the United States by promoting the adoption of science-based weed risk assessment tools to screen new exotic plants before they become a problem—especially for novel bioenergy feedstocks.

Round goby fish (Neogobius melanostomus). Photo by Eric Engbretson, USFWS

Round goby fish. Photo by Eric Engbretson, USFWS

NECIS members are working to ensure that maritime shipping does not introduce new aquatic invasive species by strengthening federal regulation and working to identify and implement new solutions to prevent invasion via ballast water discharge and biofouling.

Grass carp, DOI. USGS. Southeast Ecological Science Center.

Grass carp, DOI. USGS. Southeast Ecological Science Center.

To protect the Great Lakes from invasion by Asian Carp and other harmful non-native species, NECIS members are working to secure a permanent separation between the Mississippi River Basin and the Great Lakes.

Citrus longhorned beetle. Photo by Art Wagner

Citrus longhorned beetle. Photo by Art Wagner

NECIS members are working to strengthen early detection and rapid response capabilities for invasive plants, wildlife, and pests and pathogens by contributing to the development of a national system for early detection and rapid response, and by securing adequate funding and resources for effective inspection, monitoring, and eradication programs.

Brown marmorated stink bug. Photo from Wikimedia Commons user Yerpo.

Brown marmorated stink bug. Photo from Wikimedia Commons user Yerpo.

NECIS members are working to connect the twin threats of climate change and invasive species to ensure that agencies and the public are prepared for and can adapt to climate-related alterations in invasive species risks.

Bullfrog, photo by Alexander L Galt, USFWS

Bullfrog, photo by Alexander L Galt, USFWS

NECIS members are working to expand the community of legislators interested in and educated on invasive species issues, as well as to build broader awareness of the issue more generally.