invasive species

NWF Praises Constrictor Snake Species Listing as “Injurious Species”

The National Wildlife Federation (NWF) praised the March 6th announcement by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) that it is banning import of four species of large constrictor snakes that pose a serious risk to America’s wildlife and their habitats. Large non-native constrictors, such as the Burmese python, are devastating native wildlife in places such as Florida’s Everglades. The announce ...[Read More]

Tackling the Challenge of Invasive Species: A Coordinated and Comprehensive National Response

Today the National Environmental Coalition on Invasive Species (NECIS) released a document outlining a vision for a comprehensive national response in order to tackle the challenge of invasive species.  The vision is intended to address the inadequate authority, capacity, and coordination of the current federal response to invasive species issues. The NECIS vision is unique in that it emphasi ...[Read More]

House Judiciary Committee Passes Snakes Bill

Last week the House Judiciary Committee passed H.R. 511, a bill from Representative Rooney (R-FL) that would add nine species of large constrictor snakes to the list of species that are prohibited from being imported or crossing state lines. Unfortunately, this positive effort was undermined by an amendment to allow a broad exemption for certain exhibitors of snakes, including many roadside zoos a ...[Read More]

NECIS Comments on Climate Adaptation Strategy

Yesterday, the National Environmental Coalition on Invasive Species (NECIS) delivered comments on the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s draft National Fish, Wildlife and Plants Climate Adaptation Strategy. The coalition commended FWS for the development of the Climate Adaptation strategy and focused their comments on strengthening actions to prevent and control invasive species. For the complete co ...[Read More]

Global red fire ant invasions traced to southern US

ScienceDaily (Feb. 25, 2011) — Red imported fire ant invasions around the globe in recent years can now be traced to the southern U.S., where the nuisance insect gained a foothold in the 1930s, new University of Florida research has found. http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/02/110224145558.htm